Open access is the dream for any scientist says Mauro Serafini, Chief Editor of Nutritional Epidemiology

Healthy food in heart and cholesterol diet concept on vintage boards

“I live for science and research has always been a fascinating driving force in my career. I am moved by the importance of developing key research in human nutrition, to improve daily life, extend longevity and to raise the importance of crucial factors like nutrition for well-being,” says Mauro Serafini, Specialty Chief Editor of Nutritional Epidemiology.

Across the world, life expectancy is on the rise but what about our quality of life? Degenerative diseases and pre-pathological conditions stemming from an imbalanced and uninformed approach to food remains a global challenge.

Mauro Serafini, Specialty Chief Editor of Nutritional Epidemiology in Frontiers in Nutrition
Mauro Serafini

The link between obesity and disease is well-established, however with childhood obesity in developed countries on the rise, Serafini tells us that a new approach is needed. “We need to define dietary patterns and tailor sustainable diets to individual needs to reduce the detrimental role of food as a primary risk factor for chronic disease.”

The journal’s expansion into Nutritional Epidemiology will enable researchers to access cutting-edge research freely. Authors benefit from a wide dissemination of their research to international communities of fellow scholars, policy-makers, industry experts and the public. “Open access is the ‘dream’ for any scientist…The scientific community will benefit from a free circulation of the scientific information, fostering interdisciplinary research and ensuring a better level of the scientific quality of communication,” says
Serafini.


Nutritional Epidemiology is now open for submissions, and is welcoming submissions on two inaugural Research Topics:

Objective Dietary Assessment in Nutrition Epidemiology Studies edited by Megan McCrory of Boston University and Natasha Tasevska of Arizona State University

Beyond the Pyramid: Healthy Foods Not Included in the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid edited by Licia Iacoviello and Marialaura Bonaccio of Mediterranean Neurological Institute (IRCCS), Italy as well as
Romina di Giuseppe of University of Kiel and Saverio Stranges of University of Western Ontario


Follow Frontiers in Nutrition on Twitter and register for article alerts to receive the latest research.

Frontiers journals lead in citations and rank in top Impact Factor and CiteScore percentiles. See full analysis

1 Comment on Open access is the dream for any scientist says Mauro Serafini, Chief Editor of Nutritional Epidemiology

  1. Mauro, I met you in Malta in 2007 at the Annual Polyphenols conference. The content of that conference changed many of my misconceptions on phytochemistry. Thank you for your ongoing contribution to the science that underpins the diet-disease connection.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s